Sodyera (sodyera) wrote in conlangs,
Sodyera
sodyera
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Yal Dawo: pre-heat wave

LINGUA-NERDING, Based on a Retweeet of a picture of a waterfall (What else do you think of just before a predicted heat wave?)

waterfall: Soor'e Gesh'e (Hon. n.)

When I started to teach myself the old language, I divided a page in half. On one side were words that were HONOURATIVE and on the other half were LESSER, or common words. Lessers are words that, the word and nothing but the word. It willl appear with its customary conjugations, or not, whether it's a verb or a noun or something else. Honouratives are words that are affected by other words or word-parts which serve to make them more complictaed.

Here, the term "waterfall" translates as "falling water", and so soor'o (v., to fell) becomes not only an adjective but an adverb (falling), and therefore gets a conjugative ending after the apostrophe to modify the noun for water. You're literally saying, "water, it fallls".  You're also making  a distinction. Gesh'e refers to drinkable water, or water you can hold in a cup or use from a faucet, while Aw'u (n.) refers to a body of water like a pool, a lake, or a sea, while a river is Cva (n., pron. "Kvah") . If you just want water to splash around, that would just be Awu Gesh'e and would be a common, or lesser word and it is using both terms to specify its meaning.  One may also use Neess (N./v.) to refer to a shower or sprinkle, or ˆmuth or Muthëd
for  a flood.

I make an effort to translate one or two Sartine words per day at Twitetr.com@ArielCinii
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